The Steel Woods

Live Nation and The Hamilton Live Present

The Steel Woods

The Trongone Band

Wednesday Mar 28

Doors: 6:30 pm / Show: 7:30 pm

$12.00 - $17.00

This event is all ages

For any wheelchair or ADA needs, please contact the Box Office in advance of the performance at (202)-769-0122.

Please note that the front row of tables and chairs will be cleared for this show to create a general admission Pit. Be advised that there may be some seated areas where vision of the stage is obstructed.

The Steel Woods
The Steel Woods
Wes Bayliss: vocals, electric/acoustic/baritone guitars, piano, dobro, keys, harmonica
Jason “Rowdy” Cope:electric and acoustic guitars, bass guitar, piano, percussion
Jay Tooke, drums and percussion
Johnny Stanton: bass

“The stories told in all these songs / Don't sound the same to everyone / Some you hear, and some you see / And all that means is whatever it means to me / Not all are real, but all are true / Cause all that means is whatever they mean to you”“Whatever It Means To You”

Like their name, The Steel Woods are a hybrid musical force, part hard-edged, part Americana roots country folk, man-made, yet organic, rock but also bluegrass, R&B, blues, gospel, soul and heavy metal, “the materials which America is built on” according to co-founder Wes Bayliss. The Nashville-based band is also steeped in the ethos of Southern rock, with the music on its debut Woods Music/Thirty Tigers release, Straw in the Wind, both timeless and indefinable, sounding like it could’ve been recorded at any point during the past half-century. “That’s kinda the idea,” nods Bayliss.

The Steel Woods trace an unbroken line from Jimmie Rodgers and Hank Williams through Willie and Waylon, then the Allmans, Blackfoot, The Band and Tom Petty up through contemporaries like Kings of Leon and the Avett Brothers.

“I grew up on Willie Nelson, Waylon Jennings and Led Zeppelin,” says Jason “Rowdy” Cope, who was born in Asheville, NC, in the shadow of the Blue Ridge Mountains, where he heard some pretty impressive pickers, which inspired him as a kid. “Our music is like good bluegrass, with the electric guitars turned up to 11,” he says.

There is a biblical, hellfire-and-brimstone morality at work on songs like the good-and-evil parable, “Axe”, the first song they ever wrote together -- which takes off on co-founder Rowdy’s ominous, rumbling bluegrass guitar line -- or the galloping countryrhythms of “Della Jane’s Heart”, a murder ballad about a spurned woman taking her revenge on a fickle lover, and immediately regrets her actions. “The Secret” goes back to the Garden and Adam’s original heartbreak, equating the duplicitous Eve with the Devil himself. The musical melting pot ranges from the stark acoustic strumming of “Whatever It Means to You” and the thunderstruck drone of their speeded-up Black Sabbath cover, “Hole in the Sky”.

The band’s founders are two native sons of the south who both hail from small-town, Bible Belt backgrounds. The Alabama-born Bayliss played harmonica from the age of eight in his family’s gospel band, eventually teaching himself piano, bass and drums. Rowdy turned his love of Jimmy Page and Jimi Hendrix into a career as a session guitarist/songwriter and producer, moving to Los Angeles then playing in Jamey Johnson’s band for nine years. The two met in Nashville during a one-off gig, and immediately felt a connection. “We decided we were pretty much on the same page and wanted to do our own thing,” says Wes. “We had an idea and a vision.”

The pair spent a month fishing together, eventually bringing guitars along with their poles to the tiny hole and discovered an affinity. It was then they began to make music together. “It just worked, his voice and me doing my thing on guitar,” says Rowdy.

The result was an EP, which, because they hadn’t written anything together except for “Axe”, included covers by hot Nashville writers like Rowdy’s frequent collaboratorsinger/songwriter Brent Cobb (“Better in the Fall,” “The Well,” “If We Never Go”, “Let the Rain Come Down”) and revered artist Darrell Scott (“Uncle Lloyd”).

With originals such as the acoustic ballad, “I’m Gonna Love You”, the narrative title track, the philosophical “Whatever It Means to You” and the cathartic closer, “Let the Rain Come Down”, the songwriting/production team of Bayliss and Cope is proving quite a formidable duo. The two, who co-produced their debut album, are committed to doing things their way.“We’re not murderers, we’re just the messengers,” says Bayliss about some of the songs’ more gruesome scenarios. “Wedon’t preach. We just want to play good songs with good stories. As long as they come back to hear us again, I’m happy.”

“We’re into this to heal people’s hearts,” explains Rowdy. “If you’re given a talent that can shake plates in the earth, that can really change the world, you have a responsibility to use that for good. Music is the most powerful, emotion-driven art form in the universe because it transcends language. It’s like a sharp blade. It can be used to kill, or in the hands of a surgeon, to heal someone.”

The Steel Woods aren’t in this for the money, the fame or the awards. For them, music is a matter of life and death, right and wrong, bad and good, with the sinners punished for their transgressions, and the noble achieving the kind of transcendence the man dying of thirst in “Let the Rain Come Down” receives.

“Everything has its price,” says Rowdy. “You reap what you sow...We’ve poured so much into this band. I know how little sleep we’ve had, how many bad meals we’ve eaten. I just hope these songs can help people get things off their chest.”“We want to get good songs out to a bunch of people who need them,” adds Wes.

“We just want to make a living making music because it’s the greatest job in the world. I don’t mind working, but I preferloving what I do.”
The Trongone Band
The Trongone Band
Hailing from Richmond, VA, The Trongone Band is touring in support of their 2017 debut album, “Keys to the House”, released on Harmonized Records. With a sound that Paste Magazine likens to the “freak-outs of My Morning Jacket with the Muscle Shoals-inspired Leslie speakers and The Band’s narrative storytelling”, The Trongone Band is turning heads and making an impact on the Southern Rock ‘n’ Soul and Americana scenes. Formed by brothers Andrew and Johnny Trongone with father John Sr on bass, The Trongone Band (tron-GO-knee) has grown from a family affair, playing a weekly sold out residency at Richmond’s Cary Street Cafe, to a full on touring machine with the addition of keyboardist Ben “Wolfe” White and bassist Todd Herrington. In the words of Live for Live Music, “the quartet has come together to create an old-school and all-in-the-family sound reminiscent of the Allman Brothers while still keeping it fresh with their cutting edge original compositions that also infuse funk and blues into the mix.”

Keeping with the homegrown vibe, the band nestled into the woods outside of RVA, tapping into Montrose Recording’s Flickinger console, one of only seven remaining in the world. Known as the console that revolutionized the recording industry in the 60s & 70s, the Flickinger provided the warm sounds that turned into “Keys to the House” and brought to life what MusicFestNews described as “imagery of boxcar drifters, rolling hills and dirt roads that are easy to close your eyes and get lost in”. Summer and Fall of 2017 saw The Trongone Band taking “Keys to the House” on the road while touring in support of Americana stalwarts Reckless Kelly, American Aquarium and Cris Jacobs. Having graced the stages of Virginia’s Roosterwalk, Tennessee’s Riverbend Music Festival, Florida’s Riverhawk Festival, West Virginia’s Deep Roots Mountain Revival and The Allman Brothers’ Peach Festival, the band is primed for a busy 2018 festival season. This four-piece ensemble may not all be related, but with a chemistry so emphatically discernible, it's fair to call them brothers.
Venue Information:
The Hamilton
600 14th St NW
Washington, DC, 20005
http://www.thehamiltondc.com